The Stolen Car Ring & The New Gyrm

Tonight we begin with another story of Blackie Blackie, a jewel thief and safecracker written by Jack Boyle who certainly had the background to write stories involving criminals since he was one himself. Jack Boyle grew up in Chicago, Illinois. While working as a newspaper reporter in San Francisco, he became an opium addict, was drawn into crime, and was jailed for writing bad checks. Later convicted of robbery, Boyle was serving a term in San Quentin when he created the character of Boston Blackie, which became a detective in adaptations for films, radio and television. The first four stories appeared in The American Magazine in 1914, with Boyle writing under the pen name “No. 6066”. From 1917 to 1919, Boston Blackie stories appeared in The Red Book magazine, and from 1918 they were adapted for motion pictures. Actor Chester Morris was the best-known Blackie, playing the character in 14 Columbia Pictures films (1941–1949) and in a 1944 NBC radio series. While investigating mysteries, Blackie invariably encountered harebrained Police Inspector Farraday, played by Maurice Tarplin and always solved the mystery to Farraday’s amazement. Initially, friction surfaced in the relationship between Blackie and Farraday, but as the series continued, Farraday recognized Blackie’s talents and requested assistance. Let’s go back to 1946 for the episode entitled “Stolen Car Ring.

And stay tuned for A Day in the Life of Dennis Day.

Owen Patrick Eugene McNulty, better known as Dennis Day, was an American singer, radio, television and film personality and comedian of Irish descent. In 1939 he sang on network radio with bandleader Larry Clinton. The 23-year won an audience poll as a favorite vocalist. Day appeared for the first time on Jack Benny’s radio show on October 8, 1939, taking the place of another tenor, Kenny Baker. He remained associated with Benny’s radio and television programs until Benny’s death in 1974. When Day got his own radio sitcom, he continued to play essentially the same character that he originated on Benny’s program. However, for this series, Day lived in the fictional town of Weaverville. He stayed at a boarding house run by Clara Anderson, played by Bea Benaderet. Day was engaged to their daughter Mildred, played by Barbara Eiler. His character worked at Willoughby’s Drug Store, where his boss was Mr. Willoughby. The show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive. Verne Smith was the announcer, while music was provided by Bud Dant and his orchestra. The format of the show would begin with a song by Day, followed by the first half of the plot, a second song by Day in the middle of the episode, the rest of the plot, and then a third song by Day to finish the episode. Tonight’s episode is called “New Gym”.

Download This Episode

Listen on Google Play Music